@RuPaulsDragRace Team Talks Show’s #Social Impact – #PaleyFest; #DragRace

deep in the mayonnaise jar (Aisha Tyler) — Things on the Paleyfest stage got a little more glamorous on Sunday when host RuPaul Charles and judges and producers of RuPaul's Drag Race graced the stage to talk about the creativity, uniqueness, nerve and talent it takes to make the Emmy-winning reality show that has snatched our wigs for 11 seasons (plus four All-Star seasons). Moderated by Aisha Tyler, the Drag Race team talked about the slayworthy eleganza extravaganaza and camp of the VH1 reality series, but also the awareness the show has brought to the LGBTQIA+ communities and those who have ever been marginalized — especially in the divisive climate we live in now.

Supermodel of the world RuPaul was joined on the stage with the show's regular judges Michelle Visage, Carson Kressley and Ross Mathews as well as Drag Race producers Randy Barbato, Fenton Bailey, Tom Campbell, Steven Corfe, Mandy Salangsang, Pam Post and Tim Palazzola. Yes, the show has given us some of the most epic lip sync battles of all time, gag-worthy looks and tons of workroom drama, but behind all the paint and powder, Drag Race has made an entire community feel seen. Showcasing drag culture in mainstream media started with the 1990 documentary Paris …

Supermodel of the world RuPaul was joined on the stage with the show’s regular judges Michelle Visage, Carson Kressley and Ross Mathews as well as Drag Race producers Randy Barbato, Fenton Bailey, Tom Campbell, Steven Corfe, Mandy Salangsang, Pam Post and Tim Palazzola. Yes, the show has given us some of the most epic lip sync battles of all time, gag-worthy looks and tons of workroom drama, but behind all the paint and powder, Drag Race has made an entire community feel seen. Showcasing drag culture in mainstream media started with the 1990 documentary Paris is Burning (and possibly even before that). Drag Race has amplified this message and continues to do so in its 11th season.

Charles points out that Drag Raceis a “reflection of a global idea”. “We learn how to integrate and behave with one another,” he said. “We learn how to navigate different cultures and ask questions.” This is more evident this season which features one of the most diverse casts in the show’s history. In addition to members of the black and Latinx community, the 11th season features Asian immigrants as well as the show’s first Muslim drag queen named Mercedes Iman Diamond, who in the most recent episode is apprehensive to talk about her religion with her fellow contestants and the cameras — it is certainly a story that will unfold throughout the season.

“It’s taken a while to get where Ru is,” said Visage. “This is the queen right here. There have been many attempts to do other shows — but there is a reason why RuPaul’s Drag Race works.”

After the applause calmed down, Charles stood on his feet and thanked the crowd and said, “I just want to add that the RuPaul’s pop up shop is upstairs right here at the Dolby Theater.” Dino-Ray Ramos/@aishatyler

Source: aishatyler, full story

 

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