@NatGeo — You Eat Thousands Of Bits Of #plastic Every Year; #Health #Diet #Industry

This never-ending debate — or conversation, if you prefer — about sustainability and healing the planet will never end if the powers that be will keep dancing around the issue, placing blame on the consumers instead of looking at the big picture. In the grand scheme of things, the consumers are mostly reactionary pieces of the puzzle. Consumers buy what is being marketed to them — or brainwashed, if you prefer — and do what they're being “told.” From regulatory bodies, scientists, researchers, “experts,” and even the media at large are all complicit on this on-going public brainwashing to consume more, orchestrated by industry.

It's never about consuming less, it's consuming something else.

Ever noticed how many times they modified the food pyramid? A lot. Sure, new studies and lessons learned helped us improve our eating habits. But if you dig deeper, you can almost see the hand of industry wielding its power over what should consumers consume more. From carbs to meatless diets, there's always an ominous power in the background at play.

It's never about consuming less, it's consuming something else — like eating soybeans instead of meat. It's never about stopping production of plastics and other non-biodegradable materials, it's about disposal. Why? Blaming consumers doesn't hurt industry's bottom-line.

The ones who make and market undesirable consumer goods are never at fault, the conversation is always about consumers and consumption. One can argue that its about demand not the supply. I beg to differ. With the billions of dollars being funneled in advertising campaigns, from broadcast television to location-aware apps, ads are everywhere. People are bombarded with advertisements in their waking life, there's no escaping. That's how demand is created. Consumers wouldn't “demand” for something if it doesn't exist, well, unless there's a real need for it.

If humans are really serious about saving the planet (and themselves), the conversation needs to change. It needs to focus on industry, the ones who created and sold all the products consumers buy.

As a result, people and the planet are suffering. From pollution, deforestation, landfills, obesity, depleting to natural resources and even species extinction — I'm looking at you Japan and your whaling industry — these are all symptoms of industry activity, not the root cause. The root cause is greedy industry whose only concern is to make money.

If humans are really serious about saving the planet (and themselves), the conversation needs to change. It needs to focus on industry, the ones who created and sold all the products consumers buy.

Global (National Geographic) — It's possible that humans may be consuming anywhere from 39,000 to 52,000 microplastic particles a year.

Though abundant in water, air, and common foods, it’s unclear how it might affect our health.

A new study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology says it's possible that humans may be consuming anywhere from 39,000 to 52,000 microplastic particles a year. With added estimates of how much microplastic might be inhaled, that number is more than 74,000.

A microplastic particle is any piece of plastic smaller than five millimeters, but many are much smaller and only visible under a microscope.

The study reviewed existing research on microplastics found in beer, salt, seafood, sugar, alcohol, and honey. To calculate how often one person might eat each of those items in a year, the study looked at recommendations made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The research team also looked at studies that reviewed the amount of microplastics in drinking water and air. People who meet their recommended water intake through tap water ingest an additional 4,000 plastic particles annually, while those who drink only bottled water ingest an additional 90,000, the study found.

Source: NatGeo, full story

 

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